Beneath the Naked Sun

$9.00 each

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Fife’s words are so fierce and strong that readers will see her, standing with her fists clenched, defiantly spitting out an answer to Webster’s definition of the word “savage.”

 

From her vantage point on the margins of what’s generally called “mainstream society,” lesbian Cree poet Connie Fife writes “from the place most people would like me to stay.” Described as “baldly polemic” by one reviewer, Fife’s words are so fierce and strong that readers will see her, standing with her fists clenched, defiantly spitting out an answer to Merriam Webster’s definition of the word “savage.” Here, she writes, “I am the one whose death was intended/ and didn’t die.” Beth Brant writes that Fife’s first book of poetry sings “songs of sorrow, of celebration, of anger, of love, of giving and receiving. Connie Fife has made music out of the chaos and pain of being indigenous and lesbian in a culture that respects neither.” The cover photo of a Kootenai elder woman dragging on a cigarette is a perfect match to Fife’s spare and honest poems.

 

Author: Connie Fife (Cree)

Binding Availability: Paperback

Published: 1992

Tribes/Ethnic Groups: Cree