Dirt Road Home

$13.00 each

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New England Indians have a history of being written off as not being “real Indians.”  Savageau speaks to this.

 

New England Indians have a history of being written off as not being “real Indians,” a bunch of “half-breeds” at best, who have completely lost their traditions. In her second book of poetry, Savageau speaks to this—of being of mixed parentage (“We’re French and Indian like the war/ my father said/ they fought together/ against the English/ and though that’s true enough/ it’s still a lie/ French and Indian/ still fighting in my blood”), of being of the earth (“You taught me the land so well/ that all through my childhood/ I never saw the highway/…Driving down the dirt road home/ it was the trees you saw first,/ All New England a forest”), of family, of racism and poverty, and of home—and to what extent lives have still managed to be lived in the old way.

 

Author: Cheryl Savageau (Abenaki/Métis)

Binding Availability: Paperback

Published: 1995

Tribes/Ethnic Groups: Abenaki, Métis