Aseban: The Ojibwe word for Raccoon

$4.50 each

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Typical of traditional stories, this one both explains natural phenomenon and describes appropriate behavior for being a good person.



Aseban (the Ojibwe word for Raccoon) is playing tricks and stealing from a couple of old grandfathers. Nanaboujou catches Raccoon in the act and draws rings around Raccoon's eyes and tail and says that in the future, Raccoon must find food at night when it is hard to see and wash the food in water. This story is based on a traditional Chippewa story told by Amelia LeGarde. Although the illustrated story portion of the book is in English, the Chippewa text is included  in the back of the book. Typical of traditional stories, this one both explains natural phenomenon and describes appropriate behavior for being a good person.

This is a more advanced book than the others in the series developed by David Martison for the Duluth Indian Education Advisory Committee. The sentences are longer and words more complex than in the other readers so makes a good next step book for children who liked the earlier books. The vivid illustrations  are paintings by Judy Borgren and portray the spirit and enliven the action of the text.

Although the series is getting a bit old (developed from 1975-1978) it continues to be culturally and pedagogically appropriate. We also carry these other titles in the series: Real Wild Rice, Shemay the Bird in the Sugarbush, Manabozho and the Bulrushes, and Cheer Up Old Man.

 

Author: Amelia LeGarde, edited by David Martinson

Illustrations: Color illustrations by  Judy Borgren

Binding Availability: Paperback

Published: (1978) 2003

Tribes/Ethnic Groups: Ojibwe