Waheenee: An Indian Girl’s Story

$13.00 each

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In Waheenee’s stories, young readers will get a warm narrative of the day-to-day lives of the Hidatsa people and their Mandan relatives.

Available in paperback only.  Buffalo Bird Woman (Hidatsa), as told to Gilbert L. Wilson, Waheenee: An Indian Girl’s Story. (1921), 1981, b/w illustrations by Frederick Wilson.

Waheenee-wea (Buffalo Bird Woman) was born in 1839, two years after the devastating smallpox epidemic that wiped out most of the Mandan and about half of the Hidatsa people. The survivors consolidated and moved north, where they founded Like-a-Fishook Village. Waheenee’s great-grandmother White Corn and grandmother Turtle told her many stories of these times. In the early 1900s, Waheenee herself told many stories to the anthropologist Wilson. Here, she tells of emulating her mothers and grandmothers, learning her growing responsibilities and teaching a puppy his, farming and harvesting and preparing vast amounts of food, moving camp, welcoming visitors, fooling around with girlfriends, teenage crushes and poking fun at clan relations, and listening to stories that teach why certain behaviors are to be cultivated or avoided. In Waheenee’s stories, young readers will get a warm narrative of the day-to-day lives of the Hidatsa people and their Mandan relatives.