Walking the Choctaw Road: Stories from Red People Memory

$11.00 each

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Tingle’s twelve stories tell of ordinary people doing extraordinary things as magic brings healing, shape shifters test bravery, tragedy leads to courage and true friendships develop in the worst of places.

Available in paperback or hardcover.  Tim Tingle (Choctaw),  Walking the Choctaw Road: Stories from Red People Memory. 2003, b/w photos.

Tingle’s twelve stories tell of ordinary people doing extraordinary things as magic brings healing, shape shifters test bravery, tragedy leads to courage and true friendships develop in the worst of places. Choctaw women make magic so that enslaved people can cross Bok Chitto and get to freedom’s side. The medicine and wisdom of an elder woman—“keep working to the good”—give a boy the courage to defeat a shape-shifter. A youngster carries the memories of his mother, and her bones, as he continues with the okla nowa, people walking, on the Trail of Tears. A widowed woman with a healing stone shows a young boy that you don’t have to be blood to be family. A child at an Indian residential school, unable to attend his brother’s funeral finds that “wherever you are, you can always find one decent person.” A twenty-year war between father and son is resolved, and when Mawmaw regains her sight, there is no more Saltypie. These are evocative tellings by and for the Okla Homma, red people, clay people “kneaded out of this place,” people who, as Tingle says, “reached across boundaries to offer a hand to those in need.” Written in a down-to-earth, accessible style, these stories will appeal to cynical young people who don’t especially like to read.


Also available in CD format.