Dzáni Yázhi Naazbaa’/Little Woman Warrior Who Came Home: A Story

$18.00 each

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During what has come to be known as the “Navajo Long Walk” (1863-1864), U.S. soldiers grabbed up some 8,000 Navajo women and men, children and old people, and marched them off to a concentration camp known as Bosque Redondo (Fort Sumner).

Available in hardcover only.  Evangeline Parsons Yazzie (Diné), Dzáni Yázhi Naazbaa’/Little Woman Warrior Who Came Home: A Story of the Navajo Long Walk. Color paintings by Irving Toddy (Diné), Navajo translation by the author, 2005.

During what has come to be known as the “Navajo Long Walk” (1863-1864), U.S. soldiers grabbed up some 8,000 Navajo women and men, children and old people, and marched them off to a concentration camp known as Bosque Redondo (Fort Sumner). On this death march of several hundred miles, more than 3,000 died of cold and starvation or were killed. Dzáni Yázhi Naazbaa’ (Little Woman Warrior Who Came Home) is a young girl who survives the Long Walk and the four-year incarceration at Fort Sumner. Yazzie, to whom these family stories have been passed down, spares little detail—the terror of being forcibly taken from home; seeing the elderly and sick being shot as they fall behind; experiencing crop failure and having to rely on foreign, rotten and bug-infested rations; stealing food from the soldiers’ horses to allay starvation. But throughout the torture, persecution, hunger and homesickness, the parents and elders feed the children with perseverance and hope that come from the clan system and the prayers and stories, and the knowing that the land, culture and community will survive. And, indeed, Little Woman Warrior does come home. Toddy’s paintings, especially those of the land and the frightened children, complement this bilingual story, in Navajo and English, of endurance and strength.