The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition

$25.00 each

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This beautiful book is a tribal response to the media frenzy describing the Lewis and Clark expedition only from the perspective of the “discoverers.”

Available in paperback or hardcover.  The Salish People and the Lewis and Clark Expedition, by Salish-Pend d’Oreille Culture Committee and Elders Cultural Advistory Council, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.  2005, maps, b/w and color photographs, b/w art and color paintings

On September 4, 1805, dozens of lodges were set up in the Upper Bitterroot Valley in what is now called “Montana.” As their horses pastured on the lush grasses, more than 400 Salish people were enjoying the warm sunny days and cold nights, harvesting and preparing chokecherries and red osier dogwood berries, and preparing to move toward the plains for the fall buffalo hunt. On that day, the scouts spotted a group of pale-skinned men approaching the encampment. This beautiful book is a tribal response to the media frenzy describing the Lewis and Clark expedition only from the perspective of the “discoverers,” drowning out the voices of the Salish people and ignoring the cultural and political context in which the expedition—a “reconnaissance for invasion”—occurred. Now, in Salish and English, the elders speak.