The Morning the Sun Went Down

$14.00 each

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This is an autobiography and the history of a people. It’s about material poverty and richness of spirit, about the nightmares of white foster homes and boarding schools, and about the human responsibility for life upon earth.

Available in paperback only.  Darryl “Babe” Wilson (Atsugewe/Acho'mawi), The Morning the Sun Went Down. 1998.

Wilson was in the second grade the morning the sun went down. That was the morning that his mother and baby brother, stopped on the highway because their car had run out of gas, were killed by a speeding lumber truck. That was the morning of his father’s descent into the hell called alcoholism, and the morning that, “at seven years old, my life withered and turned a silent gray, like an old-time photograph of Indians in feathers and Buffalo Bill in buckskin. A photograph curled up at the edges, sun-cracked and moisture-warped. I had to escape. So, as the Elders of my tribe advised, ‘Just Dream.’ I dreamed...” The Morning the Sun Went Down is Wilson’s autobiography and the history of a people. It’s about material poverty and richness of spirit, about taming rattlesnakes and daring to dream, about the nightmares of white foster homes and boarding schools, and about the human responsibility for life upon earth.