Traditional Indian Stories

$11.00 each

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Stories address what it means to be human, our need to ask why, our need for explanation, our need to resolve the contradictions found in our own culture and our need for rues so we can live together in an orderly society.

Available in paperback only.  Traditional Indian Stories: Selections from the Ojibway, Cherokee and Hopi Nations, by Patricia Buffalohead and Robert Desjarlait.  B&W illustrations.  1991.  84 pages

Traditional Indian Stories  is part of the Grandmother Spider’s Web Series of Teacher Guides produced by the Anoka-Hennepin Indian Education Project. This guide explores the rich and exciting oral literature of three American Indian tribes. The stories, told for countless generations, express profound truths about the nature of human existence. The stories address what it means to be human, our need to ask why, our need for explanation, our need to resolve the contradictions found in our own culture and our need for rues so we can live together in an orderly society. The content of this unit of the Traditional Indian Stories unit is intended to be used in the winter months.
 
Grandmother Spider’s Web Series has been developed to be incorporated into the secondary education curriculum. Each unit includes a teacher guide, student readings, student activities, and bibliography. The series includes the following titles: Grandmother Spider’s Web: Incorporating American Indian Themes into the Secondary Curriculum; Modern Indian Issues: Repatriation, Religious Freedom, Mascots and Stereotypes, Tribal Sovereignty, Tribal Government, Tribal Enterprises, Treaty Rights; Ojibway Family Life in Minnesota: 20th Century Sketches and Traditional Indian Stories: Selections from the Ojibway, Cherokee and Hopi Nations.
 
A second series called the Inside the Culture Series was developed for younger students to provide them with a better understanding of the contributions of American Indian peoples to the collective intellectual achievements of humanity.  The four richly illustrated workbooks include teacher information and student handouts and activities. Designed for fifth-grade students, these can easily be modified for other grades. The series was developed for the American Indian Language and Culture Education program, Anoka-Hennepin School District, Minnesota State Department of Education and is illustrated by Red Lake Ojibwe artist Robert Desjarlait. The four titles in the Inside the Culture Series are: American Indian Astronomy, American Indian Communications Systems, American Indian Timekeeping Devices, and American Indian Toys and Games.
 
Other titles from Anoka-Hennepin include: Plants and Their Uses by the Chippewa Indian People (Teacher Guide and Student Booklet) and Ni-Mi-Win:A History of Ojibway Dance.

All titles are available from Oyate