Why Coyote Has the Best Eyes

$30.00 each

+

This story originates with the Hupa tribe of Northern California and was passed on to us by Elsie Rickleffs, tribal elder. Demonstrates one of the purposes of traditional stories--to help children learn.

Available in VHS.  Why Coyote Has the Best Eyes, by Klamath Trinity Unified School District Indian Education and Shenandoah Films.  10 minutes, 1991, color, live action and animation

This story originates with the Hupa tribe of Northern California and was passed on to us by Elsie Rickleffs, tribal elder. This is just one of the mnay stories about Coyote, a common story character in many stories from many different indian tribes. Coyote sometimes represents a trickster, a buffoon, and in other cases a creator. He often seems to represent the true essence of human nature. In this story, Coyote tricks Fish into switching eyes with him so that Coyote could have the better eyes, the story explains why fish today have poor eyesight. But because the animals in the story act the way people sometimes act, there is also a lesson for the listener about problems caused when someone acts in a selfish or greedy manner and the problems it causes for those around them.

The video demonstrates one of the purposes of traditional stories--to help children learn. The story is told by William "Indian Bill" Carpenter in Hupa and English. The narrator is Barbara Redner, the singer is Ralph Miguelena.

Why Coyote Has the Best Eyes is a great video on its own but is also part of the Indians of Northwest California: History, Social Science, and Literature Based Curriculum Units for grades 3-5 developed by the Title VII Indian Education Program in Hoopa California. The entire curriculum is also available from Oyate.

Oyate also carries the book version of Why Coyote Has the Best Eyes.