Return of the Sun

$13.00 each

+

A collection of 26 folk tales. Bruchac’s approach in telling these stories is not as an ethnologist or folklorist, but as a person of Indian ancestry who has found himself taught and guided by such stories.

Available in paperback.  Return of the Sun, by Joseph Bruchac, with illustrations by Gary Carpenter.  1990, 204 pages.

Peace and balanced relations, among humans and between humans and the natural world, are central themes in this collection of 26 folk tales.

In his introduction, Bruchac writes that when the balance is upset, as in the Tuscarora story of “Why People Speak Many Tongues,” the consequences are always unpleasant.

Some of these stories are so ancient that they are found, in varying forms, among many Native American nations.

Bruchac’s approach in telling these stories is not as an ethnologist or folklorist, but as a person of Indian ancestry who has found himself taught and guided by such stories. The author has chosen not to tell stories which do not appear elsewhere in print. He explains that this is done out of respect for Native storytellers who deliberately refrain from writing down stories because they wish them to remain in the oral tradition.

The folk tales include the Anishinabe story “The Coming of Corn,” “How the People Got Fire,” a Penobscot story, and “The Origin of Medicine” (Tuscarora). Each story is accompanied by Gary Carpenter’s delicate illustration.

Gary Carpenter is an illustrator-graphic designer as well as a professional musician. On illustrating for this book, Carpenter wrote, “It was a pleasure to bring to life talking rocks, giants, and adventures with our animal friends. It was a privilege to share with Native Americans their sensitivity and respect for nature.”

A poet and teacher, Joseph Bruchac has been writer-in-residence at Hamilton College, Columbia University, and numerous local libraries and Indian reservation schools, as well as teaching Native American literature at the State University of New York at Albany. He has been featured as a storyteller at festivals around the world, and was sponsored by the Institute of Alaska Native Arts to work with native storytellers from Juneau to Barrow.

Publisher: The Crossing Press
Languages:  English, Algonquin, Iroquoian languages
Culture Group: Northeastern Woodlands