The Star-Man and Other Tales

$20.00 each

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Imbued with humor, vision, mystery, and dreams, the stories and art reveal the power of Ojibway myth-making and a world of star-visitors, magical thunderbolts, thunder people, sea serpents, and mermaids.

Available in hardcover only.  The Star-Man and Other Tales, by Basil H. Johnston & Jonas George (Wah-sa-ghe-zik), with Illustrations by Ken Syrette (Nohdin).  1997, 63 pages.

The singular young man who could remove the thunderbolt from the tree, the dog who could understand humans, and the mermaids who helped the Anishinaubaek are all characters you’ll meet in The Star-Man and Other Tales.

The ancient storytelling and picture-making traditions of the Ojibway (Anishinaubae) people find new expression in the myths and legends collected by Basil Johnston and illustrated with vibrant contemporary Native art in this delightful book.

In celebration of these traditions, The Star-Man brings together legends told by current narrators Basil Johnston, Sam Ozawamik, and Frank Shawbedees with others told by Jonas George, of the Rama First Nation, early this century. The tales are exquisitely illustrated by Ken Syrette of the Batchewana First Nation.

Imbued with humor, vision, mystery, and dreams, the stories and art reveal the power of Ojibway myth-making and a world of star-visitors, magical thunderbolts, thunder people, sea serpents, and mermaids.

Basil Johnston is an Anishinaubae member of the Cape Croker First Nation, in Ontario. A storyteller and author, he worked for twenty-five years for the Royal Ontario Museum, with a mandate to record and celebrate Ojibway (Anishinaubae) heritage, especially language and mythology.

Jonas George was born on the Rama First Nation, in Ontario, around 1850. A member of the Chippewa of Rama, his Native name was Wah-sa-ghe-zik, meaning “A Shining Day.”

Ken Syrette is an Anishinaubae member of the Batchewana First Nation, in Ontario. He signs his work with his Native name, Nohdin, an Ojibway word meaning “Wind.” His art has been described as lyrical and joyful, often humorous, and always intensely colorful.

Publisher: Royal Ontario Museum
Language: English, Anishinaubae terms
Culture Group: Anishinaubae