White Roots of Peace

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The orally transmitted epic of Deganawidah, the Peacemaker, is the extraordinary story of a charismatic spiritual leader whose vision and practical political genius brought order and peace in a time of chaos.

Available in paperback or hardcover.  White Roots of Peace, by Paul Wallace, and illustrations by John Kahionhes Fadden.  1986, 157 pages.

The orally transmitted epic of Deganawidah, the Peacemaker, is the extraordinary story of a charismatic spiritual leader whose vision and practical political genius brought order and peace in a time of chaos. It was through the efforts of the Peacemaker that the warring tribes of the Northeast joined together to form the Iroquois Confederacy, more than 500 years ago. The Peacemaker’s work is preserved in the legend and history retold here and in the Confederacy’s traditional constitution, which now influences many Native American governing systems throughout the United States. It also has had a major—and rarely acknowledged—impact in shaping the American Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution.

The Iroquois Confederacy itself remains united under Deganawidah’s unbroken lineage,  represented by Chief Sidney I. Hill, the Tadodaho, and temporal and spiritual leader of the Six Nations when this book was written. Chief Hill has provided a message for this edition. The late Chief Leon Shenandoah, former Tadodaho, wrote the foreward. In an epilogue, historian John Mohawk takes up the story where Paul Wallace left off, chronicling the Confederacy’s struggles to preserve its lands and sovereign dignity since the eighteenth century.

The teachings of the Peacemaker remain vital today, offering an inspired model for consensus-building among nations and peoples throughout the world.

Paul Wallace, born in Cobourg, Ontario, in 1891, was a pioneering historian/anthropologist, among the first to present Indian history based on first-hand information acquired through long personal association with Indian leaders and elders. White Roots of Peace, written in 1946, was followed by Indians of Pennsylvania, Thirty Thousand Miles with John Heckwelder, and Indian Paths of Pennsylvania, all dealing with Indian-White relations. In recognition of his work, Wallace was adopted by the Mohawks and given the name To-ri-wa-wa-kon, meaning “Holding a Message.”

John Kahionhes Fadden, a member of the Mohawk Nation and Turtle Clan, has been an art educator with the Saranac Central School District for over thirty years. He has illustrated over fifty publications, and his work has been exhibited in the United States, Canada, and Europe. He recently illustrated the children’s book, Skywoman with his son, David Kanietakeron Fadden.

Publisher: Clear Light Publishers
Culture Group: Iroquois