The Supreme Court and Tribal Gaming

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Ralph Rossum explores the origins, arguments, and impact of the Court’s landmark decision and brings to life the essential debates pitting Indian rights against the regulatory powers of the states. A must-read!

Available in paperback only.  The Supreme Court and Tribal Gaming: California v. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, by Ralph A. Rossum.  2011, 216 pages

When the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians—a small tribe of only 25 members—first opened a high-stakes bingo parlor, the operation was shut down by the State of California as a violation of its gambling laws. It took a Supreme Court decision to overturn the state’s action, confirm the autonomy of tribes, and pave the way for other tribes to operate gaming centers throughout America. In its wake a multibillion dollar tribal gaming business, encompassing more than 230 tribes in twenty-nine states, has emerged.

Ralph Rossum explores the origins, arguments, and impact of the Court’s landmark decision and brings to life the essential debates pitting Indian rights against the regulatory powers of the states. As Rossum shows, Cabazon also brings together in one case a debate over the meaning of tribal sovereignty, the relationship of tribes to the federal government and the states, and the appropriateness of having distinctive canons of construction for federal Indian law. His concise and insightful study makes clear the significance of this landmark case as it attests to the sovereignty of both Native Americans and the law.

Publisher: University Press of Kansas